Project reviews

Scrap Bucket Basket Review

After a recent fabric purchase, I realized I was running low on storage space. Turning some of my fabric scraps into storage containers seemed like a great way to kill two birds with one stone. In this post I’m reviewing the Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog.

The online tutorial and a link to the pattern for this project are available here:

Scrap Bucket Basket Tutorial

Note this pattern is for personal use only.

Here are my thoughts on this project.

The tutorial is introduced with a note about the author’s motivation for creating the project and a photo. The project is described as being appropriate for all levels and has a skill level of 1.5 buttons. Describing the skill level needed to complete a project is a great idea. I think less experienced sewers will really appreciate this information as it will help them decide whether or not to tackle this project.

Supplies, tools and the  seam allowance are covered next. “Main fabric” in the supplies section links to a separate tutorial on turning fabric scraps into yardage.  The Sewing Loft Blog’s fabric scraps into yardage tutorial uses fabric scraps in the 1″ to 2.5″ size. I wanted to use larger fabric scraps so I sewed my scraps together with a 1/4″ seam allowance.  If you’re not familiar with this method, Creating With Claudia has a great tutorial on the process: create yardage from fabric scraps.

Step 0:

My fabric stash was already sorted by fabric type (canvas, home décor, quilting weight and lighter cottons, polyester, nylon) and scrap size (~ fat quarter, ~ letter-sized, ~ ½ letter-sized, and everything smaller than that). Laying out my fabric scraps in an aesthetically pleasing way was still the most time consuming aspect of this project. I had previously printed and assembled pattern pieces for the the bucket base and bucket side. I  arranged my fabric scraps on the pattern pieces instead of creating an entire ½ yard of “main fabric”. Unfortunately I didn’t leave enough overlap to account for all the seam allowances and my 9″ x 35″ rectangle was only 9″ x 30″ when I finished sewing it together. Having to create an additional 9″ x 5.25″ of scraps that matched the aesthetics for the project was frustrating.

Here are some photos of my finished panels:

 

Sewn By Tanya Project Review | Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog - prepared 9x35" panle
Completed 9×35″ panel

 

Sewn By Tanya Project Review | Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog - completed bottom panel
Completed bottom panel
Step 1:

Step 1 of the Scrap Bucket Basket project is creating the paper pattern pieces, applying fusible fleece tot he back of the main fabric and cutting out the pattern pieces. Once I had applied the fusible fleece, I was ready for step 2.

Step 2:

Step 2 is machine quilting the fabric and fusible fleece together. While the tutorial doesn’t include instructions about how to do the machine quilting, I noticed that a series of evenly spaced diagonal stitching lines are visible in some of the photos. I estimate that the lines are spaced about 1/2″ apart. I also know from previous quilting projects that more quilting provides more stability. Quilting lines spaced ~1/2″ apart would also help secure fabric scraps in the range of 2.5″ (or less) together. That being said, you can quilt your layers together however you want. I used my 2″ wide ruler to draw a diamond pattern on the back of my fusible fleece and sewed along those lines.

Sewn By Tanya Project Review | Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog - quiling lines on wrong sides of pieces
Quilting lines on wrong sides of pieces

Here’s a closeup of my quilting.

Sewn By Tanya Project Review | Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog - close up of quilting
Close up of quilting
Steps 3 & 4:

Step 3 is sewing the rectangle into a tube and step 4 is sewing the tube to the base. I’ve sewn curves and circles before, but was surprised by how much more difficult it was to evenly pin the side tube and oval base together. The project tutorial includes a tip to pin the 4 marking first then ease the fabric into the space in between. What worked for me was creating 8 evening space marks around the oval base and tube, pinning the match these 8 marks, then pinning halfway between these marks.

Steps 5-7:

Step 5 is sewing the lining pieces together and step 6 is attaching the lining the exterior together. After turning right side out, pressing, top stitching, and closing the opening gap (step 7) your Scrap Bucket Basket could be complete.

Steps 8-10:

Step 8-10 are installing the eyelets (aka grommets) and adding the rope handles.

The last section the tutorial is some additional sewing tips. I read the entire project tutorial before beginning and was mindful of these tips throughout. They are a worthwhile addition to the tutorial. I also liked that most of the steps had either a photo or illustration to assist you.

Here are some photos of my finished Scrap Bucket Basket.

Sewn By Tanya Project Review | Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog - bottom of finished project
Bottom view of Scrap Bucket Basket
Sewn By Tanya Project Review | Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog - front view
Front view of Scrap Bucket Basket
Sewn By Tanya Project Review | Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog - side view
Side view of Scap Bucket Basekt

Personally I liked my bucket more before I installed the grommets and rope handles. Personal aesthetics. I’ll omit those steps next time I make this project. Since completing my Scrap Bucket Basket, I’ve sorted the 2.5” to 3” scraps from those that are less than 2.5” in size. I’m looking forward to making another Scrap Bucket Basket using the Sewing Blog Loft’s method of turning fabric scarps into yardage.

Have you sewn a fabric storage container? Do you have any ideas for using up fabric scraps? Comment below and/or Pin me for later!

Tanya

Sewn By Tanya Project Review | Scrap Bucket Basket by The Sewing Loft Blog

 

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